Chancellor's Club Fellows

Featured Fellows

These fellowships are awarded to the brightest and the best graduate students at UCI who also show great promise as future leaders. Nominations are made by Deans for scholars in their respective schools. The support and generosity of the Chancellor's Club members has allowed promising graduate students to be designated as Chancellor's Club Fund for Excellence Fellows.



 
Julius A. Edson

Julius A. Edson

Research: Engineering new material based antimicrobial to treat drug resistant infections

Biography
Julius Edson received his B.S.E in Chemical Engineering with a concentration in Nanotechnology and Bioengineering from the City College of New York. He is currently a NSF GRFP fellow pursuing his Ph.D. in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering in the lab of Dr. Young Jik Kwon. His research focuses on the development of nanoantibiotics capable of reversing drug resistance in bacteria, such as drug resistant M. tuberculosis. He has founded Responsive Polymers Therapeutics, Inc. in order to turn his research into a viable pharmaceutical product.


Jason Gowans

Jason Gowans

Research: The Photographic Image and Technology

Biography
Jason Gowans (Born Kelowna Canada, 1981.) is currently a MFA candidate at The University of California Irvine and completed a BFA in photography at Concordia University in Montreal Canada, (2010). He has had a devoted art practice and has exhibited work throughout The United States, Canada, and Europe. Gowans artwork and research focuses on how the photographic image has evolved through technology and how images influence our lives politically and subconsciously. Gowans specifically focuses on the camera apparatus, social media, and surveillance to investigate these issues.  

In addition to his own practice Jason Gowans has been dedicated to education and community outreach. He founded Gallery 295 in Vancouver, Canada. Gallery 295 was a non-profit art gallery devoted to exhibiting emerging photo based artists and providing them with access to facilities to produce their work. Gallery 295 regularly worked with Artists for Kids to provide arts education and opportunities for children throughout the Vancouver area. Currently, throughout the summer sessions Gowans works with The Oxbow School, a non-profit devoted to providing arts education to youth aged 14-18.


Mallory Hinks

Mallory Hinks

Research: Atmospheric Aerosols

Biography
Mallory Hinks earned her B.S. and M.S. degrees in Chemistry from San Diego State University in California in 2008 and 2011, respectively. She will complete her Ph.D. in Chemistry in 2017 under Professor Sergey Nizkorodov. Her doctoral research here at UCI has focused on atmospheric aerosols, which, as a whole, contribute one of the greatest uncertainties in our understanding of climate change. She specifically studies how environmental conditions can change the chemical composition, viscosity, and concentration of these aerosols in the atmosphere. Her work will help us better understand how aerosols can affect both climate change and air quality.


Faezeh Tork Ladani

Faezeh Tork Ladani

Research: Nanophotonics, Nano-Electromagnetics

Biography
Faezeh Tork Ladani completed her undergraduate work at Isfahan University of Technology, Iran, in 2007 with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering- Communication.  She received her M.S. in the same field from Shiraz University of Technology, Iran, in 2010.  Faezeh will complete her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 2017.  Her research at UCI started on electrodynamic analyses of plasmonic nano-antennas, the breakthrough technology for providing optical detection sensitivities and miniaturization of nano-photonic devices in developing compact portable sensors that can detect chemicals in either the atmosphere or solutions.

Since 2014, she joined the Center for Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) at UCI to expand her multidisciplinary research in direct and extensive collaboration with the scientists at the CaSTL Center. Besides her research on plasmonic nano-antennas, Faezeh also develops a new theoretical framework for describing the physics underlying Photo-induced Force Microscopy (PiFM) and its effectiveness. PiFM is an emerging technique for imaging nanostructures and molecules.


Janice Phung

Janice Phung

Research: Autism spectrum disorder in a family context

Biography
Janice Phung completed her undergraduate work at UCLA in 2009 with a B.A. in Psychology and minor in Applied Developmental Psychology. She will complete her Ph.D. in Psychology & Social Behavior at UCI in 2017. Janice’s dissertation study examines the theoretical and practical implications of a community-based martial arts intervention on cognitive and social functioning in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). She also conducts research with the UCI Center for Autism Research and Translation, examining the relations between sleep, and individual and family well-being. Janice is passionate about her research objectives, which are twofold: 1) To improve our understanding of child development in the family context for both neurotypical children and those affected by ASD, and 2) To provide research-based approaches to help children and their families lead healthier and happier lives. In addition to her scholarly activities, Janice is committed to her role as a Leadership Coach in DECADE Plus, where she serves as a mentor for Chancellor’s Excellence Scholars. As a proud first-generation college student herself, Janice firmly believes that the unique talents of diverse individuals are what higher education needs to continue to advance science and the arts. Janice is the recipient of the Paul and Frances Dickman Graduate Student Research Award (2016, School of Social Ecology), Pedagogical Fellowship (2015-2016, Center for Engaged Instruction), and Faculty Mentor Program Fellowship (2014-2015, Graduate Division).


Zachariah Reagh

Zachariah Reagh

Research: Memory and neurocognitive aging

Biography
Zach is a Ph.D. candidate in Neurobiology and Behavior in the Francisco J. Ayala School of Biological Sciences. He holds a B.S. in Psychology and a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he studied the ways we perceive, represent, and remember information in the world, particularly emotional information. As a doctoral student, Zach studies memory and how it is supported by distinct networks of specialized regions in the human brain. His dissertation research focuses on episodic memory – recall of people or objects embedded in their spatial or temporal context – and how certain components of episodic memory break down more drastically than others as the brain ages. Through this work, he hopes to shed light on how relatively healthy aging alters basic memory processes in the brain, and inform future investigations of how this differs from pathological aging (such as Alzheimer’s disease). Zach’s ultimate goal is to establish himself as an independent memory researcher and to continue contributing to our understanding of memory and brain aging as a professor of neuroscience.


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